.NET 4.0

.NET 4.0

Back to the Basics: LINQ and You

03 Nov

This past weekend I was a presenter at IowaCodeCamp, my favorite local .NET event each spring/fall.  My session this year was "Back to the Basics: LINQ and You" and it was much more popular than anticipated!  After spending a lot of time training development teams over the past year I found that although LINQ has been available since 2008 many individuals have either not yet had the chance to use it yet in their projects or those that are using it still didn't fully understand how/why it works the way that it does, and thus my session was born!

tags: .NET 3.5, C#, .NET 4.0, Quick Tips, .NET 4.5

Load Testing Your Application: Art or Science?

12 Sep

Earlier this year I blogged about this importing of understanding and knowing how your application will perform under load.  (See it here).  After receiving a lot of questions from individuals wanting to learn more about "how" they can load test their applications and the tools that I use when testing applications I thought it would be good to follow up with a post to shed a bit of light on the process.  

tags: ASP.NET, DNN Development, .NET 4.0, Performance, .NET 4.5

Using radCaptcha Via DotNetNuke Wrappers

23 Jun

When putting a form that is public facing we often need to add a captcha to help prevent bots from submitting our forms.  Historically there has been a control available within DotNetNuke that worked for this, but admittedly it didn't have the best customization nor was it the most "pretty" of them out there.  Ever since DotNetNuke has had the Telerik Controls a new option has been available yet its usage isn't the most widely documented.  In this post I'll show you how to use RadCaptcha in your own custom modules.

tags: DNN, DNN Development, .NET 4.0, Quick Tips, .NET 4.5

jQuery and Clicking an ASP.NET Linkbutton

21 Jun

As a web developer one common request is to make sure that the interfaces we build out for users look the best that they can and also provide users with the best experience both via the keyboard and mouse.  As part of this we will often have areas of conflict.  This post is going to cover one common scenario that will impact users that might be using DotNetNuke common styles or working to create their own custom button styles.  With ASP.NET it is common for people to use "LinkButton" controls to trigger actions rather than your standard "Button" controls as they are easier to style.

tags: ASP.NET, .NET 3.5, DNN Development, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5

Improving the C# Debugging Experience - DebuggerDisplay

12 Aug

In an effort to start blogging more about the "helpful" items that I have encountered over the years this is one of my first "Quick Tips" related to improving the life of the developer.  We all have had those times where we are tracking down a complex problem within an application and all along the way we have to spend endless time mousing over individual classes to find out what their values are when most commonly we just want to know about one or two key values.  Well in this post, I'll show you a neat trick using the "DebuggerDisplay" attribute to help make this process easier.

tags: .NET 3.5, C#, .NET 4.0, Quick Tips

WPF Chart Styling Explained

20 Apr

Some of the big additions to the .NET Framework in .NET 3.5 Service Pack 1 were the Charting Components that give a rich, out-of-the-box solution for displaying charts in your application.  However, one thing that I've always found very hard is locating information on how to control the look and feel of the individual charts.  In this posting I'll show you how to style the following elements of a chart: Title, Legend, Independent Axis, and Dependent Axis.  This will show the key areas of styling.

tags: .NET 4.0, WPF

Causing a Specific Control to Postback

18 Apr

I was recently debugging an issue with a form where the user wanted the "enter" button when pressed in a textbox to trigger a specific ASP.NET button to postback to the server.  I have done similar things in the past with a method that changes for the pressing of Character 13 which is the enter key, then finding the button by id and then continuing on.  Well recently I found out that depending on the structure you can still get some "interesting" results.  So I went looking for a different method, and came up with the following.

tags: ASP.NET, .NET 4.0, Quick Tips

Modfying WPF Textbox or Other Control Behavior

17 Apr

So as I have mentioned in previous blog postings and on Twitter, I have been working a lot more recently in WPF than in recent months due to a big project I had been completing. One of the final "Client Review" items that I had to resolve was that they didn't like the way that the textboxes worked. The default behavior for textboxes in WPF when tabbing into them was to put the cursor at the beginning of the field. I agree that the usability was not good, but I had over 400 textboxes and didn't want to have to change all of them. SO I went digging for a solution....

tags: .NET 4.0, WPF, Quick Tips

Font Variations and WPF Textblocks

11 Apr

Over the past few months I have been working on more projects using Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and I have ran into numerous fun "learning experiences".  Of of these recent ones prompted me to put up a "Quick Tip" posting.  The quick tip in this posting is around formatting of custom font structures within a WPF TextBlock.  Specifically around sub-scripting, super-scripting, and internal font variants.

tags: .NET 4.0, WPF

.NET Memory Management and You!

09 Apr

I teach introduction and advanced .NET development courses for a local community college and one item that I always cover in each class is a discussion around Memory Management and Garbage Collection. I am often asked by my students if this is something that they really should be concerned about and my opinion has always been yes, but I know that many developers feel that having an intimate understanding of how Garbage Collection is completed is unnecessary. Finally after a number of constant reminders from students, I thought I would actually put out my "simple" version and explanation out here that I give my students each semester and gather some feedback from my blog readers on their thoughts on the manner.

tags: C#, VB, .NET 4.0

First Chance Exception Event .NET 4.0

26 Mar

I have been spending quite a bit of time recently working with Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4.0, working to keep up to date with the rapid additions to the .NET framework.  In this blog posting I'll share one fun new addition to the .NET framework that can be very helpful when creating applications and looking for a method to log all exceptions for logging purposes.  Starting with .NET 4.0 there is a new event available from the AppDomain object "FirstChanceException".  The following explains a bit about this new feature and how it could be helpful.

tags: .NET 4.0

Selecting the Right .NET Language the VB or C# Debate

23 Mar

Now first of all, before I get into the true content of this blog posting I do NOT want to start another round of the religious war that always seems to happen when you start talking about the usage of Visual Basic or C#.  The purpose of this blog posting is to put a little perspective into why I choose to work with a specific language for different projects, and the evaluation criteria that I use when making the choice for individual projects.  Yes, I'm a C# MVP, C# is my preferred .NET language, but I'll be the first to admit that there are times and places where VB is a necessary language.  In this article, I'll start out by providing a bit of background as to WHY I'm blogging about this, the evaluation criteria that I use when looking at a project and some other general information that I've found over the years.  Keep in mind the disclaimer found at the bottom of this posting, these are my thoughts, and mine alone, if you don't like them, which I'm sure many of you will not that is fine, but I wanted to put a bit of perspective on my take for the common argument.

tags: .NET 3.5, C#, VB, .NET 4.0

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